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Disability charity receives incredible response to Katie Price documentary

National disability charity, Sense, says that it has had a huge response to the BBC documentary, ‘ Katie Price: Harvey and me’, that was broadcast on 25th January 2021. 
 
The documentary, available on BBC iPlayer, follows Katie Price and her disabled son Harvey in a crucial year of his life, as he turns 18 and becomes an adult: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000rpv6
 
Sense supports families and people with complex disabilities, which includes information and advice, as well as specialist care.  Following the BBC broadcast, many parents, some in a similar situation to Katie, contacted the charity to show their support.
 
Richard Kramer, Chief Executive of national disability charity Sense, said:Katie Price documentary
 
“The programme was incredible because as well as highlighting the issues that parents of children with complex disabilities face, it also showed its joyous and rewarding moments. Harvey is star, and the incredible bond between him and Katie is clear.
 
“By bravely opening up about her family’s experience, Katie Price has raised awareness of the pressure on families in her situation – and over the last 12-months, with many services reduced, or stopped altogether, the pressure has never been greater.
 
“We’ve been inundated with messages of support, as well enquiries from the general public to learn more.
 
Families in a similar situation, facing questions about the long-term care of their loved ones, have said they are happy the issue is getting more attention – and that it helps them feel less alone.
 
“The transition to adulthood that Harvey is experiencing is a crucial period. It means navigating a different care system and settings, and many parents have to make difficult choices about the future and what’s best for their child and the wider family.
 
“There have been misconceptions that parents are not doing right by their child in seeking full-time care, but there should be no shame or judgment in finding the right support for their child and themselves. Specialist care settings can be hugely beneficial, supporting disabled children and young adults to become more independent, learn new skills, have fun and make friends. This also means parents and family members can have vital respite from caring around the clock for their loved ones.
 
“Ultimately what matters is that everyone, no matter how complex their disabilities, has the right to live independent, happy and healthy lives.”
 
If you have been affected by the issues raised in the documentary, or want to discuss options around social care, college or funding, you can contact the Sense Information & Advice service: https://www.sense.org.uk/get-support/information-and-advice/