Sensory garden

How to create a sensory garden at school

Girl in sensory garden at school

With their interesting sights and smells, sensory gardens are perfect additions for schools to aid with the sensory development of children. Nicky Roeber, Online Horticultural Expert at Wyevale Garden Centres, has given us his easy guide to growing a sensory garden at school.

Sensory gardens are carefully planned to invoke all five senses with their plants and décor. They’re perfect for children, especially those with autism, as it provides a safe space to explore each stimulus and promotes sensory development. With National Children’s Gardening Week fast approaching, what better time to start planning your school’s sensory garden? I’ll be giving you my best tips for creating a garden to invoke all the senses.

Charity Pays For Alannah's Garden Of Delight

Charity Pays For Alannah's Garden Of Delight

A Weston-super-Mare-based charity has funded the creation of a sensory garden which has given a local girl a new lease of life.

The family of six-year-old Alannah say they are extremely grateful to the Axentis Michael Charitable Trust, which provided £5,000 for the garden to be created.

Alannah, who lives with parents Andy and Lisa, and 11-year-old sister Ella in Weston Village, is registered blind and has global developmental delay, which means she cannot walk, talk, sit unaided or stand.

Dad Andy said: “All her needs, such as feeding, changing, and bathing, are met by us.”